Happening Highlights

In Arts & Culture, Entertainment, Things to do by Aimee HeckelLeave a Comment

I am the worst first judge of people — so predictably terrible, in fact, that if I completely ignore all of my instincts and do the opposite of what I feel, I am guaranteed to be spot-on accurate.

Most of the most important, influential, amazing people in my life, I started out hating.

I chase my repulsion now.

I don’t know if it’s that my emotional radar is so skewed or if the most interesting people are hard to peel. The girl who refuses to look at or talk to me in the gym becomes my obsession — not to make her like me but to find a way to make myself like her. What is she protecting? What is she afraid of? What opens her up? Who is she, really?

I don’t deny this makes me a creep and it often ends in rejection or awkwardness; I suck at small talk and usually barge right into, “Hi, I’m Aimee. What sets your soul on fire?” But I still can’t stop but ask myself why I am having such a strong emotional response to a person, even if that response is initially negative.

Kacie Avery is a Boulder artist who is also interested in the study of people. He bases his art around the idea that when we look at someone and feel envious, like we want to be them, that’s because they seem perfect — and that is because they are being themselves. It’s the “unique parts” of everyone that makes them perfect, Avery says.

He brings this idea to his art by creating one-of-a-kind pieces of art that not even she could ever reproduce.

Avery will be displaying his work at Foolish Craigs Cafe, 1611 Pearl St., in Boulder, throughout Boulder Arts Week, which runs through Saturday (April 8).

Boulder Arts Week is a large-scale, annual celebration of art throughout the city, which highlights everything from dance to art, reading, music, symposia, exhibitions, art walks. The calendar is extensive, spanning all day, every day.

Avery’s exhibit, “Purposefully Imperfect,” is one of the many special features of the week. His art starts with wood covered in many layers of pattern tape, stencil-painted.

“As you get closer to the painting the number of different layers becomes more clear but as you stand far away you can’t really tell the depth of it. This I also do because like most people, when you get closer you realize the depth of a person that you didn’t know was there at first,” he writes.

He then draws or paints on top of the piece with no planning or stencil, as a way to reflect how we interact with people. Unplanned, spontaneous, observing, responding, reflecting.

It makes me think about the people I meet as pieces of art, maybe characters I write in my own head, shaped by our interactions and carved out by the questions I ask and the places they let me in. In that, every person looks different to every other person; they’re all one-of-a-kind art that you could never replicate.

And apparently I like to try to chisel my characters into hard marble with a Q-tip.

Other entertainment highlights this week

Indigo Girls live recording at the University of Colorado Macky Auditorium from 7:30-9:30 p.m. tonight. Don’t tell me I’m the only person who fantasizes about witnessing a live recording of an album or show. Apparently, a live recording is a little different than a regular show and artists sometimes stop or restart a song or ask the audience to be quiet or loud at certain parts. I’m intrigued. Tickets are $25. Learn more here.

Meet the first and only blind man to summit Mount Everest at the Boulder Bookstore 7:30 p.m. tomorrow (April 6). Erik Weihenmayer is a legend for his seemingly impossible physical feats. He captures his story in his newly released book, “No Barriers: A Blind Man’s Journey to Kayak the Grand Canyon.” Tickets are $5, which you can put toward a book purchase that day.

See an opera at the Dairy Arts Center 7:30 p.m. Friday (April 7). The evening will begin with scenes from “Zarzuela,” sung by the Boulder Opera’s ensemble singers, followed by “Goyescas,” a one-act opera based on a series of paintings by Francisco Goya. So, that’s music inspired by paintings. Seems like a fitting way to wrap up Boulder Arts Week: with a two-fer.

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